jake wintermute
Long term fellow
I come from the United States, where I did my thesis work in Pam Silver’s lab at Harvard (Department of Systems Biology) with a focus on microbial communities and metabolic engineering. Before that, I studied biology and computer science as an undergraduate at New York University. In my spare time, I enjoy geeking out about science and posting memes about transgenes (@synbio1).
Jake's Bio

I’m a long-term fellow using systems and synthetic biology to discover new drugs against tuberculosis and other human pathogens. I teach Introduction to Synthetic Biology for the AIV M1 program. I also run a free online version of that course at SyntheticBiology1.com. I am the lead mentor and #1 fan of the Paris Bettencourt iGEM team as well as the CRI-Boulle Biodesign Challenge team.

Short Bio

I’m a systems biologist working for INSERM, in the group of Ariel Lindner and François Taddei. I also teach Introduction to Synthetic Biology for the Master’s Program at the CRI (Centre de Recherches Interdisciplinaires), and serve as an advisor for the Paris Bettencourt iGEM team.

I did my thesis work in Pam Silver’s lab at Harvard (Department of Systems Biology) with a focus on microbial communities and metabolic engineering. Before that, I studied biology and computer science as an undergraduate at New York University

Research Interests

My current research interests include the biology of aging, synthetic biology tools for drug discovery, and the human skin microbiome. I want to design, optimize and control microbial metabolism, usually with genetic techniques and usually with some application in mind, even it that application is far off. I like simple experiments and elegant mathematical models. I like building new hardware to do experiments that couldn’t be done before.

High Intensity Photobiology with Custom LED Arrays
What happens to living cells when they are exposed to visible light at extremely high intensities and precise wavelengths?
Synthetic Biology for Distributed Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Discovery
Help us develop scalable and open-source technologies for doing discovery anywhere.
Inferring antibiotic dose-response functions with deep learning
To automate the diagnosis of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
Open Drug Discovery Programme in Africa
A CRI-sponsored postdoctoral opportunity in sub-saharan Africa.
iGEM Paris Bettencourt
Empowering students to do synthetic biology research